Directory of Directories

Posted November 8, 2018 By dailiness
I found an interesting directory this morning. It’s Polk’s 1916 Directory of Directories. I’ve not seen other years for this directory. Under Illinois, you can see the cities with published directories. There are only five listings for the Chicago area and now there are many more. What I found most interesting starts on page 30. These listings include directory titles by occupation or industries such as Jewelers, Dry Goods, and Plumbing. 
 
Previously I have searched a city directory by occupation or business name using the keyword field. This helped me find relatives who spelled their names differently than I expected. I’d like to locate these trade and professional directories.
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On Music and Dance

Posted August 18, 2018 By dailiness

Before words perhaps there was song and dance. Learning about my Lithuanian heritage has taken me to listen to melodies or tunes sung by my ancestors. This animated video comes from  “Lullabies of the World” – a Russian animation project on the lullabies of different nations.

The lyrics in English, thanks to Tikras Draugas:

Mouse, mouse,
Carry the sleep
Under the small girl’s pillow,
The sweet sleep.

For kitty not to feel,
The small one not to awake,
For it sweetly sleep.

Mouse, mouse
Carry the sleep
Through the nine boxrooms,
Through the tenth – the guest-chamber,
The sweet sleep.

Mouse, mouse,
Carry the sleep,
Like bee carries the honey.
The sweet sleep.

For kitty not to feel,
The small one not to awake,
For it sweetly sleep,
For it sweetly sleep,
For it sweetly sleep.

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Honorific Rev – sometimes a Rabbi

Posted September 16, 2017 By dailiness

Always there is something to learn. One of the first marriage certificates I found for a family member had the name of the officiant using Rev before the surname. At the time the person who helped me find the record suggested that the couple may not have been very religious as they did not use a Rabbi.

Well, I come to learn that the honorific Rev was also used for a Rabbi.

 

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Finding Ship Manifests

Posted June 18, 2017 By dailiness

There must be dozens (or many anyway) of ways to locate information about ship sailings of genealogical significance. Today I used several sources to locate and document a record. They include:
familysearch.org
Ancestry.com
http://www.germanroots.com/ny1847.html
http://www.cyndislist.com/ports-entry/
https://familysearch.org/wiki/en/Ellis_Island,_Castle_Garden,_etc.
https://familysearch.org/wiki/en/New_York_Emigration_and_Immigration

The New York Times often listed ship arrivals each day in a column called “Marine Intelligence.” Below is notice of the ship that brought my great-grandparents Elias and Rachel to New York.

 

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One Record Leads to This & That

Posted June 16, 2017 By dailiness

After finding the ship manifest for Elias and Rachel, two of my great great grandparents, I wondered what else I could discover about this part of their emigration and immigration to the U.S. I know that this part of the family was considered a German immigrant in regards to their landing in NYC.

They sailed on the S/S Rhynland, Red Star Line. The Ships List tells me that she was a 3,689 gross ton ship built in 1879, length 402.8ft x beam 40.2ft, one funnel, four masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 14 knots. Accommodation was provided for 150-1st and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Their ship sailed every Saturday between Antwerp and Castle Garden NY. I do not yet know their passage rates but Spring and Summer rates from an ad are: First cabin, $60 to $100; excursion, $110 to $180; second cabin, $45; excursion, $80 and $85. Steerage at very low rates.
Peter Wright & Sons, Gen. Agents, 55 B’way.

The Red Star Line alone carried about two million immigrants across the Atlantic. A quarter of them were Jewish, including Albert Einstein.

I think about their voyage and what they did on the ship. Did the men play games, the women play at the piano and sing, or were my relatives in a different part of the ship altogether?

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